Peloponisos

Location


Peloponnesos is the southernmost geographic region of the Greek mainland.Originally it was an island, but intense geological upheavals in the region united and separated it from the mainland twice. Peloponnese is a rugged land that combines the scent of the sea, the mountains, olive trees, and vineyards and is a place for all seasons.  The principal modern cities of the Peloponnese are (2011 census):

Patras – 214,580 inhabitants

Kalamata – 70,130 inhabitants

Corinth – 58,280 inhabitants

Tripoli – 46,910 inhabitants

Argos – 42,090 inhabitants

Pyrgos – 48,370 inhabitants

Aigion – 49,740 inhabitants

Sparta – 35,600 inhabitants

Nafplion – 33,260 inhabitants

Peloponisos have lot and various spots for kite surf during summer and winter months.


peloponnese_greece


The Peloponnese is a peninsula that covers an area of some 21,549.6 square kilometres (8,320.3 sq mi) and constitutes the southernmost part of mainland Greece. While technically it may be considered an island since the construction of the Corinth Canal in 1893, like other peninsulas that have been separated from their mainland by man-made bodies of waters, it is rarely, if ever, referred to as an “island”. It has two land connections with the rest of Greece, a natural one at the Isthmus of Corinth, and an artificial one by the Rio-Antirio bridge (completed 2004). The peninsula has a mountainous interior and deeply indented coasts. Mount Taygetus is its highest point, at 2,407 metres (7,897 ft). It possesses four south-pointing peninsulas, the Messenian, the Mani, the Cape Malea (also known as Epidaurus Limera), and the Argolid in the far northeast of the Peloponnese. Two groups of islands lie off the Peloponnesian coast: the Argo-Saronic Islands to the east, and the Ionian to the west. The island of Kythera, off the Epidaurus Limera peninsula to the south of the Peloponnese, is considered to be part of the Ionian Islands.


monemvassia-peloponnese


output_7TG6iK


2013061207464713


Comments

comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Facebook Page Loading...

Choose your Destination

Fields marked with an * are required

Pin It